A Nautical Nursery in the Works

DIY Nautical Lamp2

Before I even was pregnant with baby #2, I thought that a nautical nursery would be super cute…boy or girl.  So I started to pin away and bookmark sites with ideas.  Then, Summer of 2013 comes around and everything is nautical.  No way!  From clothing to baby bedding, all I see are sailboats, anchors, and distressed wood.  This was kind of cool but frustrating at times.  I was excited to find prints and pillows and I added them to my personal wishlist so I wouldn’t forget.  When I checked my list (even after a week), the items were sold out and not being replaced!  I was bummed but managed to work my way around the bedding options.

I happened to find a lamp and really liked it.  It was $50 which I didn’t think was a ridiculous amount to spend on a lamp.   It was a simple lamp, with an anchor.  Pretty much like this one but NOT at a price of $116!!

Anchor Lamp

So, it dawned on me…what if I made my own lamp?  That’s when I googled “DIY Nautical Lamp”.  I came across a couple of choices that I really liked: This first one is from Vintage Lace and Vinyl.  I like the lampshade and how the base is a bubble.  I went to Joann’s and tried to find similar fabric for the shade but didn’t have any luck.  I was a little disappointed but decided to try to find a lampshade that I liked “as is”.

imagesCAMXSXQH

Here is the second lamp option, from The Happy Housie. I figured a cylindrical base would be easier to work with and so I decided to give this one a go.

DIY-Nautical-lamp-with-sisal-rope-wrap-and-lanterns-at-thehappyhousie-1024x1024

I set out on my journey to find everything I needed.

DIY Nautical Lamp Materials

I got this lamp and shade from Walmart for ~$11.  I went to Home Depot and ran into an employee who asked if I needed help with something.  I explained that the lamp needed to be covered with a cylinder shape for a project.  He said “Oh you mean like something like this packaging roll?” And he pointed to the tube in the picture (a freebie since he was just about to throw it out!).  I said, “Yes!” and then he showed me where the rope was.  I believe both of the bloggers from above mention sisal rope.  I prefered the darker color of manila rope, and that’s what I went with. It cashed in at ~$6 for 50 feet.

I measured the tube and cut it with a knife–despite probably needing a saw–and used a hot glue gun to adhere the rope.  Read the directions from the other two sites–I didn’t change a single thing–oh, I actually didn’t glue the cyclinder to the base first.  I chose to work with it freely and glue it on the lamp base after I was done.  When I was finished, it was clearly obvious that the lampshade from Walmart was too small.  So off to Target I went.  I ended up with this one for $12.99:

Target lampshade

I didn’t go with a color or pattern (although tempted) because I thought there may still be a chance to cover it with fabric.  You can’t really see it here but there is a tan webbing on the shade and it is actually really pretty.  Matches the rope too.

Here is the finished product…

DIY Nautical Lamp2

No joke, probably one of the easiest DIY projects I have ever done.  The hardest part was cutting the tube.  It was pretty thick!  The cost to make this lamp was about $25 and I bet if you visited a thrift store you could find your lamp and shade for even less.  I happened to have this starfish hanging around in some potpourri from my mom.  I am really excited about this lamp.  I think it will be perfect for our little boy’s nautical nursery.

 

One thought on “A Nautical Nursery in the Works

  1. This turned out adorably! I love the thickness of the base – and I think it looks amazing with a white shade. Makes me want to recover my shade… The side stripey shade is also super pretty… hmm. I feel another project coming on. Great job! It will look perfect in a nautical nursery.
    – Krista

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *